wmagazine:

Rainbow rags and Chanel for spring. 
Photograph by Craig McDean; styled by Edward Enninful; W magazine February 2014. 

wmagazine:

Rainbow rags and Chanel for spring

Photograph by Craig McDean; styled by Edward Enninful; W magazine February 2014. 

carolynmanningdesigns:

Orts are the tiny snippets of thread left over from sewing and embroidery. For many generations and in many cultures these bits of thread held great importance. On a base level, they represented a part of a resource (thread) that still had use as fire starter materials, stuffing, etc. But there was a higher significance as well. These were remnants of the spirit of the artists or crafts persons who used them. So, like hair or cast off clothes, orts gained a spiritual designation and were saved for special uses. They have been found in “Witch Jars” in Viking Era York and Colonial Era New England in both Pagan and Christian context. In Latin America, they are mixed in with the straw in the Christmas Manger Scene. Overall, they are considered to be lucky and full of positive energy. (Originally posted at Work of My Hands blog)

So I have like, oodles and oodles of orts. Had a different plan for some of them, and will most likely explore that later, but this afternoon I started playing with them and these beads are the result.

One more thing to collect #orts

(Source: )

carolynmanningdesigns:

Home stretch of the model for Granny’s Squares. I was hoping to have it done early tomorrow, but I’m thinking it will be more like Friday night instead.  

(Source: )

colleenmccarten:

Cotton and copper wire

colleenmccarten:

Cotton and copper wire

carolynmanningdesigns:

Finished!

carolynmanningdesigns:

Finished!

(Source: )

youmeandcharlie:

We’re obsessed with these embroidered photographs from fiber artist Mana Morimoto. Take a look!
Read More

youmeandcharlie:

We’re obsessed with these embroidered photographs from fiber artist Mana Morimoto. Take a look!

Read More

(Source: fuckyeahquilts)

(Source: fuckyeahquilts)

breadquilt:

playerpianokonzerte.de(via thisthatandwhatnot)

petitepointplace:

Lovingly created from the remnants of worn garments and embroidered with motifs and tales drawn from the rich visual and narrative repertoire of Bengal, kanthas were traditionally stitched by women as gifts to be used in the celebration of weddings and other family occasions. Kantha: The Embroidered Quilts of Bengal taken from the Jill and Sheldon Bonovitz Collection and the Stella Kramrisch Collection of the Philadelphia Museum of Art presents 44 examples of this vibrant domestic art, created by village and urban women in the Bengal region, now comprised of Bangladesh and the state of West Bengal, India between the mid-19th and the mid-20th century.

(Source: asianartnewspaper.com)

betsybull:

Beautiful detail of worn Kantha stitching.

betsybull:

Beautiful detail of worn Kantha stitching.

phorthestitch:

The Basics: The Running Stitch and its variations.

This is the basic stitch upon which kantha work revolves. Traditionally, this was only stitch that was used - both for quilting, as well as for making decorative patterns. Now its used mainly for creating the outlines of each pattern, and its variations are used as fills. (I shall go into more detail about this in a later blog post.)

The tough lesson for me has been learning how to use the running stitch as a filler for motifs as well, and not just on the boundary.

[Note: There are multiple images in this post. Roll your mouse over the tiny grey arrow on the sides of the image to click Previous or Next]

loveslavandula:

quilt by Margriet PR on Flickr.